Roxani Krystalli

Roxani KrystalliProgram Manager

Working with Feinstein Since: 2013
Based in: Somerville, MA

At Feinstein, Roxani Krystalli focuses on how to better generate, synthesize, and use evidence in the humanitarian field.  Her own research focuses on patterns of violence in mass atrocities and on victim-centered transitional justice, paying particular attention to gender and other dimensions of power. Roxani has spent a decade working on issues of gender and violence in conflict areas and transitional contexts, including working with ex-combatants and victims of violence in Colombia, Guatemala, Uganda, Sudan, Mexico, Pakistan, and other areas in collaboration with international organizations and community-based groups. Her most recent project is a multi-country refugee research study, examining the moral and financial economies of forced migration, culminating in a series of publications on the Financial Journeys of Refugees.

For her work, Roxani has been recognized with the Presidential Award for Citizenship and Service at Tufts University. She is a current US Institute of Peace “Peace Scholar,” a recipient of the Social Science Research Council International Dissertation Research Fellowship and Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship and holds a fellowship from the Henry J. Leir Institute for Human Security. Her published work has appeared in The Washington Post, The Conversation, Open Democracy, Women Under Siege, NextBillion, and the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative blog. Roxani has a BA from Harvard University and an MA from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, and she is a PhD Candidate at The Fletcher School, where she is researching the politics of victimhood during transitions from violence, with a focus on the case of Colombia.

Research Interests:
  • Transitional justice
  • Gender and violence in war and transitions
  • Humanitarian evidence synthesis
  • Qualitative research in vulnerable settings
  • The politics of humanitarianism
Regional Focus:
  • Latin America
Most Recent External Publications:

News Items

Roxani Krystalli attends workshop on female fighters at Columbia University
May 1, 2019

In April, 2019 Roxani Krystalli attended an invitation-only workshop on female fighters at Columbia University. The workshop was co-convened by Professor Dipali Mukhopadhyay and Nimmi Gowrinathan, PhD. It brought together researchers, practitioners…

Read More
Roxani Krystalli receives award at International Studies Association Conference
May 1, 2019

Roxani Krystalli was awarded the “Best Blog” award in the individual category for her writing on Stories of Conflict and Love at the International Studies Association annual meeting in Toronto, Canada…

Read More

Feinstein Research Projects

Getting in or missing out? Understanding the poor’s interactions with market systems and international programming

Feinstein’s work as part of the Apolou project seeks to understand the impacts over time of a shift to an increasingly cash-based economy on different wealth, livelihood, and demographic groups.

Read More
Social Connectedness, Livelihoods, and Resilience in Complex Emergencies

In this partnership with Mercy Corps, the Feinstein International Center team investigates the nature of social networks and social connectedness, and explores how humanitarian assistance can strengthen these as a key aspect of resilience, recovery and relief interventions in complex humanitarian emergencies.

Read More

Feinstein Publications

The currency of connections: Why local support systems are integral to helping people recover in South Sudan
support systems

The purpose of this report is to give aid actors insights into localized social protection and support systems in South Sudan and the ways in which humanitarian aid, including cash…

Read More
The Wages of War: Learning from how Syrians have adapted their livelihoods through seven years of conflict
Syrian livelihoods through conflict

In partnership with Mercy Corps, Feinstein researchers undertook this work to understand why some households are managing the devastating impacts of war better than others.

Read More