Kimberly Howe

Kimberly HoweSenior Researcher

Kimberly Howe joined the Center in September 2013 as a Senior Researcher. She currently studies the transformation of security and justice institutions in Syria, as well as local-international partnerships in insecure complex emergencies.

Kimberly Howe, Ph.D. is a Senior Researcher at the Feinstein International Center. Her research interests include: violence during peace to war transitions, armed groups and DDR processes, differential forms of sub-national governance, and humanitarian response during conflicts. She is currently leading a multi-year research project on Western initiatives to build security and justice systems in Syria, and is co-leading research on improving humanitarian partnerships in remote management settings, with a focus on Syria and Northern Iraq. She has designed and conducted mixed methods research projects in Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Colombia, Uganda, Northern Iraq and Syria. Before joining FIC, she was research consultant for the Center for Comparative and International Studies at ETH Zurich, ICTJ, ACAPs, and the Feinstein International Center. She was a Randolph Jennings Peace Scholar at the US Institute of Peace from 2010 to 2011, and has received research awards from Harvard Law School’s Program on Negotiation as well as the Feinstein International Center and the Fletcher School at Tufts University. From 1999 to 2007, she practiced as a psychotherapist treating survivors of torture and interpersonal violence. She received a PhD in International Relations from The Fletcher School at Tufts University in 2012.

FIC Publications

Internal Displacement to Urban Areas: the Tufts-IDMC Profiling Study Case 3: Santa Marta, Colombia
Tufts-IDMC-Profiling-2008-1
By Karen Jacobsen, Kimberly Howe | September 2008

The report was done in collaboration with the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre, Geneva. For more than 40 years, Colombians have been subject to chronic violence perpetrated by left-wing guerillas, paramilitaries,…

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No research associated.