Started in 2018, this partnership between Save the Children US and the Feinstein International Center aims to improve the evidence base on migration of young people to urban areas. Through this project, four Fletcher Masters of Arts in Law and Diplomacy (MALD) students were selected through a competitive process to develop and implement research projects on different cases of youth migration. The project began with a design workshop with Save the Children and Tufts faculty and staff in Washington DC. The students then conducted field work during the summer of 2018. They studied:

  • Young men moving to Bengaluru, India to take part in the growing platform economy
  • Young urban migrants in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
  • Refugee minors in Vienna, Austria
  • Eritrean refugees and asylum seekers in Kampala, Uganda

The mixed-methods research fed into the students’ capstone projects at Fletcher. In May 2019 the students returned to DC for final briefings at Save the Children. The project will culminate with a synthesis piece that includes policy and programmatic implications and recommendations. Each student will also produce a short country briefing paper aimed at practitioners and policy-makers working in the four locations.

Niharika Betkerur recently graduated from the MALD program at The Fletcher School with a concentration in Human Security and Development Economics. Before Fletcher, she worked as a campaigner with Amnesty International India, focused on migrant rights and business and human rights. She has a bachelor’s in economics from India and a master’s in international relations from London. For the Youth, Migration, and Resilience Project, she studied the financial and social impact of rural-urban migration on youth engaged in the digital platform economy. She hopes to continue working in the field of rights-based approaches to development to ensure gender and economic equity.
Sarah Carson completed her MALD degree from The Fletcher School in 2019 with a focus in development economics and business for wocial impact. Her research as a Youth, Migration, and Resilience Fellow focused on youth rural-urban migrants in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, particularly in regards to the idea of “success.” In addition to this field research, Sarah also used her time at The Fletcher School to explore interests in monitoring and evaluation, financial inclusion, gender, and Africa regional studies. In August 2019, she will join IDinsight as a Senior Associate in Nairobi, Kenya. Prior to attending The Fletcher School, Sarah worked in refugee resettlement in Pittsburgh, PA and taught English as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Rwanda. She holds a B.A. from George Washington University in international affairs, concentrating in development studies.
Mackenzie Seaman is a master’s student at The Fletcher School pursuing her MALD. At Fletcher she concentrates in gender and human security, with a special interest in conflict migration. She has worked in refugee response and migrant integration in Europe since 2015. Mackenzie’s research for this project looked at minor refugee integration in Vienna, Austria. She investigated the impact of family status on the integration behaviors of minor refugees. She specializes in forced migration flows from the Middle East, as well as migration to Europe. She holds a B.A. in political science and Eastern European studies from the University of Michigan.
Erica Shaps recently completed her MALD at The Fletcher School with concentrations in human security and humanitarian studies. During this time, was a research assistant at the Center for Strategic Studies at Fletcher. For the Youth, Migration, and Resilience project, she studied Eritrean refugees and asylum seekers in Kampala, Uganda. Erica previously worked as a Middle East program coordinator for Encounter. She was also a fellow at the Joint Distribution Committee. Erica’s passion for peacebuilding and international development emerged while she pursued her bachelor’s degree at Brandeis University with a double major in Islamic & Middle Eastern studies and international & global studies. She is a Wexner Fellow/Davidson Scholar.