Promoting Evidence-based Livelihood Programming in Karamoja, Uganda

Insecurity in Karamoja since the 1970s has limited the collection of data on key livelihood and human security issues. In particular, there is a dearth of quality data regarding the mobile cattle camps, populations living in contested and insecure areas, and gender and generational differences. Not surprisingly, major gaps exist in knowledge regarding livelihood systems, food security, mobility strategies, decision making, and gender roles at the household and community level.

Save the Children in Uganda (SCiUG) has been working in Karamoja since 1996, making it one of the international organizations with the greatest extent of institutional knowledge on the region. SCiUG is currently expanding and diversifying their programs in Karamoja. In 2009-2011, the Tufts/FIC team worked in collaboration with SCiUG on research to improve and inform programming, policy making, and advocacy through the collection and dissemination of qualitative data on key livelihood issues.

The findings from this work feed into SCiUG programming and are also shared with local and national authorities, donors and other agencies working in the region. The research coincided with a period in which a growing number of international agencies were turning their attention towards Karamoja, and we geared the dissemination of our research to help inform and improve new programming in the region.

Each research trip resulted in a briefing report for Save the Children in Uganda on the specific topic studied. These reports were widely disseminated to have the greatest impact for national and international actors working in the region.

Publications

  • Foraging and FightingThis joint publication by the Feinstein International Center and Save the Children in Uganda examines the perspectives and experiences of communities in the southern Karamoja region of Uganda regarding natural resources and conflict. The study set out to better understand local views on this topic in response to the assumption in policy circles that resource scarcity or competition drives the conflict in this pastoral and agro-pastoral area. We found that while sites of natural resource exploitation are often insecure, respondents in the study population did not attribute this to direct conflict over the resources themselves. Rather, violence is common in these locations because opposing groups are most likely to come into contact with each other at these sites. On the flip side, respondents stressed that peace allows for better sharing of resources and better management of resource scarcity in times of stress or hardship.
  • Changing Roles, Shifting RisksThis report is the result of the first phase of a partnership with Save the Children in Uganda. Based on field work conducted in April 2009 in Moroto and Kotido Districts, Changing Roles, Shifting Risks: Livelihood Impacts of Disarmament in Karamoja, Uganda examines the experiences and perceptions of communities of the present disarmament campaign carried out by the Uganda People’s Defence Force and the Government of Uganda.

This project was be conducted in partnership with Save the Children in Uganda. All information will also be publicly available.

Foraging and Fighting Community Perspectives on Natural Resources and Conflict in Southern Karamoja
foraging-and-fighting-1

This joint publication by the Feinstein International Center and Save the Children in Uganda examines the perspectives and experiences of communities in the southern Karamoja region of Uganda regarding natural...

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