Keith Proctor

Keith ProctorVisiting Fellow

Keith Proctor is a researcher on issues of transitional justice, memorialization, and mass violence in Northern Uganda.

Keith Proctor is particularly interested in using a gender lens to evaluate cultural and institutional changes in the aftermath of conflict. In addition to regular collaborations with colleagues at the Feinstein International Center, he has consulted on projects for the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights and the World Peace Foundation. Keith also regularly contributes to Fortune. He has taught at New York University, worked in U.S. campaign politics, and was Director of Public Policy for the Americans for Cures Foundation.

A recipient of David L. Boren, Truman Security, and Atlantik-Bruecke fellowships, Keith holds a Bachelor’s in Political Science from Stanford University, a Master’s in International Relations from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, where he was an Overseers Scholar, and a Master’s in Comparative Religion from Harvard University, where he was a Presidential Scholar.

FIC Publications

Modern Challenges to Traditional Justice The Struggle to Deliver Remedy and Reparation in War-Affected Lango
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By Teddy Atim, Keith Proctor | June 2013

This report is part of a series by Feinstein International Center that examines the impact of armed conflict on civilian populations in northern Uganda and struggles for redress and remedy.

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They Were Just Thrown Away, and Now the World is Spoiled Mass Killing and Cultural Rites in Barlonyo
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By Keith Proctor | March 2013

In the aftermath of violence, proper treatment of the dead provides a vital consolation for survivors and their communities.

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Tradition in Transition: Customary Authority in Karamoja, Uganda
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Customary authority in the Karamoja region of Uganda has undergone profound shifts in parallel to the changing livelihoods and security conditions in the region over the past several decades. This…

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No research associated.